1991

Murder at the Music Hall

December 1991

Directed by Joanne Llewellyn, Shirley Gay and Des Mayblom

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The Odd Couple

by Neil Simon

Directed by Shirley Gay

September 1991

This classic comedy opens as a group of the guys assembled for cards in the apartment of divorced Oscar Madison. And if the mess is any indication, it’s no wonder that his wife left him. Late to arrive is Felix Unger who has just been separated from his wife. Fastidious, depressed and none too tense, Felix seems suicidal, but as the action unfolds Oscar becomes the one with murder on his mind when the clean-freak and the slob ultimately decide to room together with hilarious results as The Odd Couple is born. “His skill is not only great but constantly growing…There is scarcely a moment that is not hilarious.” – The New York Times

“Fresh, richly hilarious and remarkably original. Wildly, irresistibly, incredibly and continuously funny.” – New York Daily News

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The Maintenance Man

by Richard Harris

Directed by Jim Williams

June 1991

This comedy by the author of Stepping Out is a bitter sweet and perceptive look at the collapse of marriage and the development and decay of an affair. Bob is a do-it-yourself enthusiast kind of guy that longs to be needed. This is why even long after his divorce he continues to visit his former home, despite how much it irritates his new girlfriend, Diana, who doesn’t like the competition from his children or his Black and Decker.

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Our Town

by Thornton Wilder

Directed by Joanne Llewellyn

March 1991

A landmark in American drama, Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Our Town tells the story of a small town, Grover’s Corners, New Hampshire, in order to tell us the story of every town, the whole world over.

Narrated by the “Stage Manager”, we follow the Gibbs and Webb families, residents of Grover’s Corners, through twelve years of life changes — from the mundane in Act I, “Daily Life,” to the romantic in Act II, “Love and Marriage,” to the devastating in Act III, “Death and Eternity.” Through the young lovers Emily and George, their strong and loving parents, and the many other Grover’s Corners’ locals,

Wilder delivers universal truths about what it means to be human. “Oh, earth,” Emily Webb exclaims towards the play’s end, “you’re too wonderful for anyone to realize you.” With humor, wit, and exceptionally powerful storytelling, Our Town offers a unique opportunity for audience members to make precisely that realization.

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